A Life of Varied Endeavors

Tag Archives: enameling

Coleus & Pearl

Here are a couple of pictures of a piece I finished a couple of months ago.  It was a long time from start to finish, and then it had a couple of “finishes” before it was really done.  The enamel piece was one of the first pieces I ever did. I think it’s about 2 and a half inches long.

Experimentation -!-

This is a piece I would have loved to sell or give to someone, but I’ve decided it’s too experimental.  Now I can enjoy it for what it is, and maybe wear it around.

The experiments include:

  • shaping an oddly shaped stray piece of copper for a pendant
  • soldering an odd shaped bail on the back
  • putting two odd enamel colors on the front
  • trying to enamel the back with a different color while leaving the bail bare
  • enameling hex seed beads on the front without melting them
  • making an inexpensive necklace to hang it from to avoid the cost – and perhaps wrong effect – of sterling silver
  • making a “clasp” that would echo the colors and feel of the pendant and seed beads.

This was one of those let-it-be things, in the end.  I love how the front of the pendant turned out. Mostly, for some reason, the enamel would not stay on the back, despite repeated tries and using proper solder on the bail.  But I like the rough and casual effect on the back as it turned out.

I do like the braided cord, and the glass bead dangles that make the “toggle”.

This piece came together over several months, and I’m glad it’s here, being what it is and nothing more.  Any thoughts or comments?  I’d love to hear them :).

Sammie's Hex Beads on Enamel Pendant

Sammie’s Hex Beads on Enamel Pendant

Beaded Daggers Toggle

Beaded Daggers Toggle

Toggle and Bail

Toggle and Bail

Experimentation Hex Beads on Enamel Pendant

Experimentation Hex Beads on Enamel Pendant

Washington State Enamelists at Grunewald Guild – October 2010

Wood Fired Enameling Kiln October 2010 Scott Dillman

Wood Fired Enameling Kiln October 2010 Scott Dillman

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Update June 2, 2011:

I’ve just received a copy of the April 2011 issue of Glass on Metal magazine which has published an article by Dave Berfield.  ‘Killer Kiln’ is Dave’s account of the genisis and execution of the idea of building a wood fired enameling kiln.  Congratulations, Dave!  Great article, and especially great chapter headings!

For some time I’ve wanted to post pictures and tell about a Washington State Enamelists’ workshop/retreat last October.  The workshop was at the Grunewald Guild in Plain, Washington, and was led by Jean Tudor, Dave Berfield, and Mary Stafford.  They planned a small and informal event that packed a lot in.

Jean taught raku-fired enameling (she is world-famous for this), and Mary taught a session on cold connections (some neat stuff came out of this class). Dave shared information about liquid enamels and built a wood fired kiln to fire enamels in.

(Click on all pictures to enlarge.)

Jean's Raku Samples

Jean’s Raku Samples

The Classroom at Grunewald

The Classroom at Grunewald

Jean Tudor and Mary Stafford

Jean Tudor and Mary Stafford

 

Jean’s impressive raku experience was on display and she shared her knowledge of raku enameling with us.  I admit that I was a bit overwhelmed as I’d had no previous exposure to the raku process.  But being overwhelmed can be a refreshing experience, and this was certainly that.  We used pine needles, leaves, wet newspaper, and  moss (a chartreuse local variety found on the ground around us) for the process, either on its own, or after firing in the wood fired kiln.

Dave is an expert in liquid/porcelain enamels on steel (LARGE enamel pieces – like architectural installations). I found a picture of his enameling shop here.

Liquid Enamels on Steel - Enamels Made by Dave Berfield

Liquid Enamels on Steel – Enamels Made by Dave Berfield

Dave Berfield Contemplating Kiln Design

Dave Berfield Contemplating Kiln Design

 

Lately Dave’s passion has been his ceramics, and at the time of our weekend workshop Dave had been studying about wood-fired kilns; he was planning on building one for ceramics at his home on Bainbridge Island.

For this weekend he teamed with Scott Dillman (Grunewald’s resident potter), to design and build (on the spot) a small kiln that we fired enamels in.

The kiln was definitely inspired.  On Friday afternoon, a couple of us picked up each fire brick by hand from Grunewald’s pottery studio, loaded them into a small pickup, and drove down the road a few hundred yards to the workshop classrooms.  Dave and Scott talked about how they thought the kiln should be designed.

Kiln in Progress

Kiln in Progress

Wood Fired Kiln and Fuel Source
Wood Fired Kiln and Fuel Source

 

Wood Fired Enamelling Kiln

Wood Fired Enamelling Kiln – you can see the yellow wire of the pyrometer on the right side – pyrometer is on the chair

As you can see from the pictures, it was pretty cool (in my opinion!).  They had it completed by mid-day Saturday.  It had a pyrometer laid in on one side, but over the time we used the kiln Scott decided that the right firing temperature (about 1500 degrees F) was best indicated by a very full, red flame coming out of the kiln’s chimney.   Those were impressive visuals.

The door to the kiln was three bricks.   We picked them, up as a group, to check a piece’s progress, check the kiln temperature, and attempt to swiftly get a piece in and out.  My favorite picture is Jean Tudor pulling her enamel piece out of the kiln.

Feeding the Fire
Feeding the Fire
Wood Fired Kiln for Enamels

Wood Fired Kiln for Enamels

Three-Brick Door on Wood Fired Kiln

Three-Brick Door on Wood Fired Kiln

Kiln from the Front - checking

Kiln from the Front – checking

 

The Flame That Signaled Good Firing Temperature
The Flame That Signaled Good Firing Temperature
Opening, Checking

Opening, Checking

 

Taking Jean's Piece Out

Taking Jean’s Piece Out

 

We had a bit of RAIN over the weekend (despite being in Eastern Washington), so we also got to experience what rain drops can do to enamels JUST out of the kiln.  (Hint – rain drops leave permanent spots on hot enamel.)  We also got to experience enameling in the rain.  I’m sure that’s also a pretty unique experience.

Taking the Piece Out, Fired in Fire Jean Tudor October 2010
Taking the Piece Out, Fired in Fire Jean Tudor October 2010
Wood Fired Enameling Kiln October 2010 Scott Dillman
Wood Fired Enameling Kiln October 2010 Scott Dillman

 

In the evenings, we got to talk and share work we had done, either during the weekend or things we had brought.  We were all immensely impressed with Jean’s latest piece.  She now has pictures of it posted on her web site – check it out!  The pictures hardly do it justice.  “Bestiary”is a collection of small panels –but large when you consider what went into each piece!  They are joined together to form a “manuscript” that features “animals we may never see again” that are on the endangered species list.  30 panels, about 5 x 5 inches each, enameled on both sides, cloisonné.  Truly amazing.  I was sorry we didn’t get to spend more time with it.

We had a great weekend, and thanks go out to Jean, Mary, Dave, Scott, all the folks at Grunewald, and all my fellow participants.  We had fun!

Enameling on Silver Foils, Palladium Leaf, Ginbari

I took a class from Coral Shafer (Enamelwork Supply Company) a couple of weekends ago that focused on using metal foils and leaf in enamel work.  I had my first experience, though very brief, with screen printing enamel – in this case on silver foil.  We used gold size to adhere metal leaf and Vaseline to adhere silver foil to fired enamels.  We used liquid enamel to set up a base to do a process called “ginbari”.  Coral sells a silver foil she calls ginbari – it’s thicker than traditional foil -, but I didn’t realize that it was intended for a special process involving embossing the foil, and then “back filling” the raised embossed areas during firing.  The liquid enamel base fills the raised lines.  

One way to accomplish the embossing is shown here (Coral’s demonstration):  24 or 28 gauge wire is glued on a non-absorbent surface, in a pattern – much like laying cloisonné wires.  The foil is then placed over the wire and a brayer is rolled over it (protected by felt) to create the raised surface.

Coral Shafer Laying Wire for Ginbari

Coral Shafer Laying Wire for Ginbari

Checking the Ginbari Foil Embossing

Checking the Ginbari Foil Embossing

After properly adhering the foil to the (already fired) liquid enamel base, and being careful to avoid pressing the raised pattern down, all is fired together.  The enamel is pulled up into the raised areas during firing, leaving the raised lines rock hard.   The “cells” can then be filled with enamel and fired.  When time permits, I’ll do this to finish my class pieces.

ginbari over textured metal sheet

Ginbari - Rolled Over Textured Metal

Ginbari Over Wire

Ginbari Over Wire - fired and ready to enamel. It takes some practice to get the foil properly placed on the piece - mine is off-center.....

I sort of fell in love with the palladium leaf.  I’m looking forward to working with that more.